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6 » Richmond, 6th Floor

There were 10 of us as new residents in September, 1955. We were given rooms on the 6th floor of Richmond. We must have been up and down the stairs 20 times a day. We became good friends and shared college life and new experiences. Bowling, shopping, mixers with other college groups and study groups were all part of a new life at Towson. The first time being independent and on our own ...

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6 » Richmond, 6th Floor

There were 10 of us as new residents in September, 1955. We were given rooms on the 6th floor of Richmond. We must have been up and down the stairs 20 times a day. We became good friends and shared college life and new experiences. Bowling, shopping, mixers with other college groups and study groups were all part of a new life at Towson. The first time being independent and on our own was a challenge and was liberating. We became such good friends. There was always someone to share a meal, go to a game or just hang out with from our floor. Sharing this brings back good memories.

Bertha Hoppert | Graduated 1959

Alumnus/Alumna, Posted 5-10-13

10 » A Ten O'Clock Scholar

In 1930's Towson State College did not have dormitories for Baltimore City students. We city students commuted daily on the York Road trolley. When it reached the city line @ Anneslie Road an additional county fare was charged to continue the ride to TSC campus--a mile or two. To avoid the extra cost we city students often chose to walk the rest of the way to school, 15 or 20 minutes. ...

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10 » A Ten O'Clock Scholar

In 1930's Towson State College did not have dormitories for Baltimore City students. We city students commuted daily on the York Road trolley. When it reached the city line @ Anneslie Road an additional county fare was charged to continue the ride to TSC campus--a mile or two. To avoid the extra cost we city students often chose to walk the rest of the way to school, 15 or 20 minutes. My Freshman year schedule included an early morning History class led by Miss Lena Van Bibber. Try as I might to be on time for the class, I was often a late arrival. A hundred pairs of eyes followed me in my quest for an empty seat in the large classroom, accompanied by Miss Van Bibber's squeaky voice reciting "A Diller, A Dollar, A Ten O'Clock Scholar; What makes you come so soon? You used to come at ten o'clock, Now you come at noon!" To this day, 76 years later, I can still hear dear Miss Van Bibber's tremulous voice chanting "A Dillar, A Dollar..." to the delight of my punctual classmates. I played clarinet in the school orchestra led by Miss Alma Prickett, who also taught a Music Appreciation class. One beautiful, balmy spring day, I decided that my musical training allowed me to skip music class and spend some time reading (a textbook assignment) on the pleasant, inviting lawn in front of Stephens Hall. Later that day Miss Prickett remarked on my absence from her earlier class. She chuckled at my explanation that the pleasant outdoors won out over the indoor classroom. Her gentle smile told me that she forgave me. I cherish those memories and memories of my classmates: Leslie Dunbar, Harry Russell, Lee McCarriar, John Sheck, Charles Gross, Mary Reindollar, Helen Picek, Josephine Hubbard, Catherine Gray, and the most beautiful girls you ever could see--Marie Parr, Helen Tribull, Helena Townsend, Margaret Well, Betty Stewart. Many may be gone, but none are forgotten.

David Nelson | Graduated 1941

Parent, Alumnus/Alumna, Posted 6-7-13

Trying to think of your special number? Here are a few ideas...

  • Your dorm room number
  • Your favorite player's jersey number
  • The number of credits you earned
  • The number of games your team won
  • The room number of your favorite class
  • Your G.P.A.
  • The number of guys in your fraternity
  • The number of times you took CHEM 110
  • Your favorite radio station's call number
  • Your college boyfriend's phone number